As companies have shifted to a work from a home model, demand has reached an all-time high for laptops and desktops. While organizations across several states had purchased equipment months ago to prepare for the impending workplace shift, most of those shipments have been delayed due to supply chain disruptions and high demand for imports from countries like China. The sanctions have not helped with the laptop shortage either, as many manufacturers such as Lenovo, HP, and Dell are struggling to get the components needed to manufacture more laptops to get out into the market. While companies like Lenovo have already planned to move some of their manufacturing to Mexico in the next coming months, it will take quite some time before components are shipped out of Mexico.

The pandemic has also contributed to supply chain issues, as many factories in China shut down for weeks on end due to their employees being infected with COVID-19. This has caused computer equipment to spike up in cost, with companies such as best buy raising prices to over $500 on 84 percent of their laptop stock.

The issue is not isolated in the US alone, though. Organizations worldwide have been running into the same challenge, as companies are demanding to keep social distancing intact and keep the offices empty, which has only increased the overall demand for equipment. Online retailers and brick and mortar stores have had their inventory wiped out for laptops, with millions more still needed equipment to perform their job duties to keep the businesses functioning.

The situation gets worse, as there seems to be no end in sight for the laptop shortage to subside any time soon. Businesses will continue to struggle with procuring needed equipment, even if companies can afford to foot the bill.